observe, analyze, understand

gaaraofsburbia:

(Source: alanlozano)

Aug 9
strawberrypantsu:

コーラ

strawberrypantsu:

コーラ

Aug 9
calming-ocean-waves:

Golden Gate Bridge / by: Nguyen Hoang

calming-ocean-waves:

Golden Gate Bridge / by: 

Aug 9

(Source: battleofthefivearmies)

Aug 1

thefreshfatboy:

lux-obscura:

showslow:

likeafieldmouse - Late Bloomers of the Arts

For all of you who’ve felt even for a second that it’s ever too late: 

1. Charles Bukowski had his first book published when he was 49

2. Leonard Cohen was 33 when his first album was released

3. Marina Abramovic’s career as an independent artist wasn’t solidified until she was 42

4. Julia Child’s career started when she was 36

5. Van Gogh started drawing when he was 27

6. Monet painted Sunrise when he was 33, but wasn’t producing his best work until his early 40s

7. Kazuo Ohno started dancing when he was 27

8. William S. Burroughs had his first novel published when he was 39

I think I’ve reblogged this before, but as someone who is 32 and feels washed up, wrung out and devoid of anything to offer, this is really important to me.

Its never to late to just DO it!

(Source: likeafieldmouse)

(Source: koenema)

kimyadawson:

 

(Source: carlsagan)

Into the Ocean

Into the Ocean

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

(Source: meowazaki)

eradicatedelicacy:

queentinabelcher:

Alcohol vs marijuana

OH MY GOD I WASNT EXPECTING THAT

eradicatedelicacy:

queentinabelcher:

Alcohol vs marijuana

OH MY GOD I WASNT EXPECTING THAT

(Source: theoreticaldolphin)

Hair progress 😯☺️

Hair progress 😯☺️